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We are the New York area workplace advocate for people in the news business, and that includes some of the best journalists in the country.

The Newspaper Guild of New York represents more than 3,000 employees at New York area-based news organizations, as well as a few non-news organizations.

Since its launch in 1934 by crusading columnist Heywood Broun and others, the Guild has been the voice in the workplace for practitioners of big-city journalism and employees in advertising, circulation and other related areas. It started with newspapers, but today the Guild’s reach extends to workers in all media.

Guild members at Scholastic consider a new contract at a meeting on Sept. 19 before voting unanimously to ratify it.
Scholastic Guild members consider new contract at Sept. 19 meeting.

Scholastic Guild members consider new contract at Sept. 19 meeting.

Guild negotiators review Thomson Reuters opening proposal on Sept. 10.
Guild negotiators review Thomson Reuters opening proposal on Sept. 10.

Guild negotiators review Thomson Reuters opening proposal on Sept. 10.

Guild officers and members were among the thousands of union members who marched in the New York City Labor Day Parade on Sept. 6.
Guild contingent gets ready to join 2014 NYC Labor Day Parade on Sept. 6.

Guild contingent gets ready to join 2014 NYC Labor Day Parade on Sept. 6.

Illegally fired El Diario employees Annette Santiago (l) and Rosa Murphy (r) were among those speaking to the press from the steps of City Hall with the support of New York's labor and Latino communities.
Former El Diario employees on the steps of City Hall at Guild press conference.

Former El Diario employees on the steps of City Hall at Guild press conference.

Secretary-Treasurer Peter Szekely briefs press about El Diario on Aug. 19.
Secretary-Treasurer Peter Szekely briefs press about El Diario on Aug. 19.

Secretary-Treasurer Peter Szekely briefs press about El Diario on Aug. 19.

    Local and Unit News

    Guild sets employee meeting on talks; contract vote possible

    September 25, 2014

    TIME INC. - The Guild will hold a meeting on Tuesday, Sept. 30 to update Time Inc. employees about contract negotiations. While Guild negotiators hope to make progress in a bargaining sessesion with management set for  Monday, it is possible that management will stand by its current "last, best and final” offer and that we may ask members to vote on it.

    S&P tells five employees it plans to subcontract their jobs

    September 24, 2014

    STANDARD & POOR'S - Five Guild-represented employees who do billing-related work in the Order to Cash Department of S&P’s Ratings Services were given 90 days' notice on Sept. 10 of the company’s intent to subcontract their work to Genpact in India. The Guild and S&P are currently reviewing and discussing alternatives to the proposal from Genpact, to which S&P sent other work in 2012.

    Time Inc., after declaring impasse, agrees to meet Monday

    September 23, 2014

    TIME INC. - A fair amount has been reported over the past few days about the state of contract negotiations between the Guild and Time Inc., some of it accurate and some of it not. Here are some checked facts. First of all, it was not the Guild that declared impasse in the talks, as one news organization reported. Secondly, management has agreed to meet this coming Monday.

    To 'lead from the front,' Reuters wants managers as reporters

    September 23, 2014

    THOMSON REUTERS - Management negotiators  reiterated their proposal to use managers as “senior journalists,” taking work away from Guild members. At the same time, management claimed ignorance during contract talks over the widespread use of “permalancers” in place of staffers, and revealed a new timeline to close the Hauppauge Data Center, perhaps as early as 2016.

    Industry News

    Front pages from Hong Kong’s ‘Umbrella Revolution’

    September 30, 2014

    Protests continue in Hong Kong, and newspapers in the region and around the world led with images of thousands in the streets on Tuesday. Here are a few of them, via Newseum and Kisoko.net. (I’ve also started a Twitter list of journalists covering the protests in Hong Kong. Email me or tweet me and let me know who I’m missing.)

    South China Morning Post:

    The Wall Street Journal Asia, Hong Kong, China:

    Apple Daily – Taiwan edition, Taipei, Taiwan:

    The Japan Times, Tokyo, Japan:

    The Straits Times, Singapore, The Republic of Singapore:

    United Daily News, Taipei, Taiwan:

    The Nation, Bangkok, Thailand:

    Philippine Daily Inquirer, Makati, Philippines:

    Financial Times, United Kingdom:

    USA Today:

    The Washington Post, Washington D.C.:

    The International New York Times:

    The New York Times, New York, New York:

    The Boston Globe, Boston, Massachusetts:

    Read more

    Star Tribune runs ad bashing transgender kids

    September 30, 2014

    Good morning. Here are 10 media stories.

    1. News Corp buys online real estate business: Move, Inc., owns Realtor.com, Move.com and ListHub. News Corp will “turbo-charge traffic growth” to Move’s properties, and it will “benefit from the high-quality geographic data generated by real estate searches,” CEO Robert Thomson says. (BusinessWire) | Last year Move “reported $600,000 in profit atop $227 million in revenue.” (NYT)
    2. Minneapolis Star Tribune ran an ad bashing transgender kids: The Minnesota Child Protection League ran a full-page ad Sunday in an attempt to influence the Minnesota State High School League, which may “approve a new policy that would allow transgender students to participate in athletics based on their gender identity.” Strib VP Steve Yaeger tells Aaron Rupar: “The ad in question met all the requirements of our ad policy.” (Minneapolis City Pages) | Earlier this year the Strib took some heat for how it reported on a transgender person.
    Read more

    100 hours: How one L.A. Times reporter binge-watched his way through an investigation

    September 30, 2014

    When Joe Mozingo came back from the Salt Lake City in September 2012, he had a lot of TV to watch. Mozingo, a reporter for the Los Angeles Times, had been on assignment investigating an FBI sting when when a source gave him a cache of discs that contained more than 100 hours of undercover footage.

    Taken together, they told the story of Ted Gardiner, an FBI informant who’d killed himself after helping expose an underground trade in illicit artifacts stolen from Anasazi land in Utah. The footage showed clandestine meetings between Gardiner and would-be criminals that eventually became the foundation of a six-chapter multimedia investigation loaded with original footage and actualities.

    Gardiner. (Screenshot from Los Angeles Times via Gardiner family)

    But before it became a story, it was just a box filled with discs.… Read more

    Today in media history: The first televised World Series game

    September 30, 2014

    73,365 fans filled Yankee Stadium on September 30, 1947 to watch game one of the World Series between the New York Yankees and the Brooklyn Dodgers. Millions of people around the world listened to their radios as announcers Red Barber and Mel Allen called the game.

    And for those lucky enough to have a TV, which were still hard to find in 1947, they could watch the first World Series game ever broadcast on television. Bob Stanton served as the NBC TV announcer. The Yankees beat the Dodgers 5-3.

    Mel Allen and Red Barber remember the 1947 World Series:

    In 2012 Philly.com posted a story about the first televised World Series game.

    “For the first time, the World Series, America’s preeminent sporting
    event, was being televised, and Philadelphians, as curious about the
    new technology as the baseball, bunched around 7- and 10-inch screens
    for a peek.

    Read more