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We are the New York area workplace advocate for people in the news business, and that includes some of the best journalists in the country.

The Newspaper Guild of New York represents more than 3,000 employees at New York area-based news organizations, as well as a few non-news organizations.

Since its launch in 1934 by crusading columnist Heywood Broun and others, the Guild has been the voice in the workplace for practitioners of big-city journalism and employees in advertising, circulation and other related areas. It started with newspapers, but today the Guild’s reach extends to workers in all media.

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David Carr, New York Times media writer extraordinaire and a Guild member, died suddenly on Feb. 12 at 58.
David Carr, New York Times media writer extraordinaire and a Guild member, died suddenly on Feb. 12 at 58.

David Carr, New York Times media writer extraordinaire and a Guild member, died suddenly on Feb. 12 at 58.

NY Guild President Bill O'Meara tells delegates to the TNG-CWA Sector Conference on Jan. 16 how their locals can get CWA funding for projects and contract campaigns.
NY Guild President Bill O'Meara on Jan. 16 tells TNG-CWA Sector Conference delegates how to get CWA funding for projects and contract campaigns.

NY Guild President Bill O'Meara on Jan. 16 tells TNG-CWA Sector Conference delegates how to get CWA funding for projects and contract campaigns.

    Local and Unit News

    Candidates nominated for CWA convention delegates, alternates

    April 20, 2015

    LOCAL BULLETIN - Sixteen candidates for delegates and alternates – eight each – to the 2015 convention of the Communications Workers of America were nominated on Monday, after the suggestion of a lack of a quorum halted nominations at last week’s Representative Assembly (RA) meeting.

    Training for ratings employees to be completed by April 24

    April 16, 2015

    STANDAND & POOR'S - The company is requiring some Ratings employees to complete job-related training, which focuses on role-specific tasks and responsibilities. The Guild has confirmed with S&P that all training may be done on company time.

    Guild members to decide on changing name and bylaws

    April 10, 2015

    LOCAL BULLETIN - Should the Guild drop “newspaper” from its name? Should we revise our bylaws to streamline our leadership and governing structures? After months of discussion and debate, first by the Guild’s Administrative  Committee and then by the Executive Committee, both bodies recommended a “yes” vote on both questions. Now it is time for all members of the New York Guild to decide these questions in a referendum.

    NLRB Accepts Guild Settlement

    April 8, 2015

    EL DIARIO-The Honorable Administrative Law Judge Steven Fish rules agreement ‘effectuates the purposes … of the [National Labor Relations] Act’ with cash for fired Guild members, settlement of charges against the company and a two-year contract with raises for bargaining unit members. The NLRB will not appeal the decision.

    Industry News

    Bloomberg gets its first Pulitzer

    April 20, 2015

    Goliath came out of the shadows Monday.

    Bloomberg News won its first Pulitzer for engrossing work by reporter Zachary Mider on corporate tax avoidance.

    His stories were cited for a “painstaking, clear and entertaining explanation of how so many U.S. corporations dodge taxes and why lawmakers and regulators have a hard time stopping them,” according to the formal statement by the Pulitzer board.

    “I am delighted for Zach – and also for Matt Winkler who spent 25 years building one of the world’s great news organizations at a time when quality journalism elsewhere has been shrinking. I hope he will now get the credit he deserves,” wrote John Micklethwait, editor-in-chief of Bloomberg News, in an email.

    Winkler is his predecessor who with Michael Bloomberg largely oversaw the creation and emergence of Bloomberg as both a financial industry and financial news staple. Read more

    For the photojournalists who covered Ferguson, winning a Pulitzer is ‘an odd feeling’

    April 20, 2015

    A demonstrator throws back a tear gas container after tactical officers worked to break up a group of bystanders on Chambers Road near West Florissant on Wednesday, Aug. 13, 2014. (Photo by Robert Cohen/St. Louis Post-Dispatch)

    A demonstrator throws back a tear gas container after tactical officers worked to break up a group of bystanders on Chambers Road near West Florissant on Wednesday, Aug. 13, 2014. (Photo by Robert Cohen/St. Louis Post-Dispatch)

    On Monday afternoon, a few hours after winning a Pulitzer for breaking news photography with the photo staff at the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, David Carson went right back to work. Earlier, there was a little champagne and a cake that went uncut for while. The newsroom was proud of the win, Carson said, but it’s hard to celebrate something that started with a young man losing his life.

    “It’s a funny feeling,” he said. “It’s hard to put into words for me right now.”

    Post-Dispatch photojournalist Robert Cohen couldn’t find the right words either. Read more

    Here’s what it’s like to win a Pulitzer

    April 20, 2015

    I spoke with four Pulitzer-Prize winners to find out how winning has changed their lives and affected their journalism. All three said the prize opens doors but it also adds pressure to live up to the high expectations of having “Pulitzer Prize Winner” on your resume.

    Poynter.org spoke with:

    jacqui-banaszynski1-200x300
    Jacqui Banaszynski,
    Knight Chair professor at the University of Missouri. She won a Pulitzer in 1988 Pulitzer Prize for Feature Writing.  She was working at the St. Paul Pioneer Press Dispatch. The stories were about the life and death of an AIDS victim in a rural farm community.

    photoDiana Sugg, contract editor for special projects, The Baltimore Sun. Sugg was a medical reporter when she reported a series of stories about stillbirths. Her stories told how “thousands of babies, many full-term, are dying every year, and few researchers have ever investigated why.” Her stories also included an examination of how some hospital emergency rooms are allowing families to be with loved ones in the last moments of life and yet another story examined why promising therapy for stroke was being held up in debates. Read more

    Among the Pulitzer finalists, traditional treatments dominate

    April 20, 2015

    All hail the Pulitzer winners! But as a bridesmaid myself long ago (National Reporting, 1982), I always give the list of finalists a careful read as well.

    Here are some quick takeaways on trends among the 27 entries that took place and show in this year’s judging:

    *The New York Times can’t win everything.  Besides scoring the most winners with three The New York Times had an additional five finalists.  The Pulitzer board sees all nominees and can thus produce a balanced ticket of winners.  The separate juries, which pick the finalists, operate independently of each other. So it is fair to say the Times’s work bubbles to the top in many and diverse categories.

    *Winners and runners-up were frequently from the same organizationsRead more