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Who We Are

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We are the New York area workplace advocate for people in the news business, and that includes some of the best journalists in the country.

The Newspaper Guild of New York represents more than 3,000 employees at New York area-based news organizations, as well as a few non-news organizations.

Since its launch in 1934 by crusading columnist Heywood Broun and others, the Guild has been the voice in the workplace for practitioners of big-city journalism and employees in advertising, circulation and other related areas. It started with newspapers, but today the Guild’s reach extends to workers in all media.

Have You Moved?

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David Carr, New York Times media writer extraordinaire and a Guild member, died suddenly on Feb. 12 at 58.
David Carr, New York Times media writer extraordinaire and a Guild member, died suddenly on Feb. 12 at 58.

David Carr, New York Times media writer extraordinaire and a Guild member, died suddenly on Feb. 12 at 58.

NY Guild President Bill O'Meara tells delegates to the TNG-CWA Sector Conference on Jan. 16 how their locals can get CWA funding for projects and contract campaigns.
NY Guild President Bill O'Meara on Jan. 16 tells TNG-CWA Sector Conference delegates how to get CWA funding for projects and contract campaigns.

NY Guild President Bill O'Meara on Jan. 16 tells TNG-CWA Sector Conference delegates how to get CWA funding for projects and contract campaigns.

    Local and Unit News

    Expanding job security

    April 1, 2015

    THOMSON REUTERS - On Monday the Guild Bargaining Committee told management that job protections should be applied equally to all members. The current contract protects only Level 1 Journalists, and only those hired way back in 1996 or before. That, of course, leaves most members at greater risk to downsizing, subcontracting or even automation.  Management negotiators’ initial response was non-committal.

    What’s really important at the bargaining table?

    March 24, 2015

    THOMSON REUTERS - Guild members say that employment security and work-life balance are among their greatest concerns but management only wants to talk about “true economic” issues, chiefly their proposal to shift more of the economic risk of health care onto employees. As if sharply differing views aren’t enough of a hurdle, delays and gaps by management in providing the Guild with needed information add to the difficulty.

    Times Unit Council rebounds after buyouts; 2 more nominated

    March 19, 2015

    TIMES - After losing 15 union officers in the buyouts of late 2014, The Times unit of the Guild has rejuvenated its network of union activists, as a dozen members were elected unit vice chairpersons, and two existing vice chairpersons were elected to higher positions on what is now a 48-member Unit Council. In addition, there were two more recent nominations.

     

    Guild, Times settle disputes of those who challenged layoffs

    March 11, 2015

    TIMES - New York Guild President Bill O’Meara is pleased to announce that the union and The Times have settled disputes and avoided arbitration over all 14 Guild members who initially challenged their layoffs of late last year through the contract’s grievance process. Six others who were laid off had decided not to grieve their dismissals.

    Industry News

    When April Fools’ Day goes wrong

    April 1, 2015

    Business Insider | BuzzFeed | Digiday

    When April Fools’ jokes fall flat, they can really fall flat. Just ask the editors of The Cavalier Daily, the student newspaper of the University of Virginia. Business Insider writer Peter Jacobs reports that for this year’s April Fools’ issue, the newspaper’s editors decided to run a phony story making light of the case of Martese Johnson, the African-American UVA student who was beaten and bloodied by agents of the state’s Alcoholic Beverage Control. In a piece titled “ABC agents tackle Native American student outside Bodo’s Bagels,” the paper pretends to report on a similar incident involving a different marginalized population and uses such fake names as “Strong Buffalo,” “Dances with Wolves,” and “Rabbit in the Grass.” After outraged students began complaining, the paper’s Managing Board pulled the piece offline and issued an apology. Read more

    Jonathan Allen joins Vox as chief political correspondent

    April 1, 2015

    Politico

    Bloomberg D.C. bureau chief Jonathan Allen has joined the explainer-driven news site Vox as chief political correspondent, co-founder Ezra Klein tweeted Wednesday.

    Beyond excited that @jonallendc is joining @voxdotcom as our chief political correspondent!

    — Ezra Klein (@ezraklein) April 1, 2015

    Politico’s Dylan Byers, who was the first to report the news, wrote that Allen was leaving his post as D.C. bureau chief for Bloomberg because he felt “marginalized due to the launch of Bloomberg Politics.”

    Like many media organizations, Vox has been staffing up to cover the 2016 election. The outlet hired Politico’s Laura McGann as politics editor and plans to make several additions to its politics team.

    Read more

    ‘That would be STUPID’: Some readers took an April Fools’ cat park story seriously

    April 1, 2015

    This year, it just happened that April Fools’ fell on the day the Colorado Springs Independent comes out. Here’s the front page of the latest edition, devoted to the story of plans for the country’s first cat park.

    CO_CSI

    This morning, the Independent pushed the story out on social media.

    “We did not know if we were going to fool people or entertain people, but it looks like it’s mostly the latter,” said News Editor Robert Meyerowitz, who hasn’t gotten any calls yet.

    And the idea wasn’t that wacky, he said. Lately, cat cafes have opened in Colorado Springs and in other parts of the country, Meyerowitz said.

    There’s even an owl bar in London. Seriously.

    The story has clues that it’s a prank, including the last names of the sources, which mostly mean cat in other languages. Read more

    Through tears, a man reads Indy Star’s front-page editorial, then resubscribes

    April 1, 2015

    The Indianapolis Star

    The Indianapolis Star Tuesday published a moving submission from one of its readers, who says he took Tuesday’s edition to his brother’s grave and “read aloud as much of the paper’s editorial as tears would let me get through.”

    With the papers under my arm, I walked to Plainfield’s Maple Hill Cemetery, and found my brother’s grave. My brother, who had been a troubled Vietnam War vet, was gay at a time when being gay was a very difficult thing to be. When he died of AIDS in 1985 in a far-off city, his refuge from his closed-minded native state, some in our family were sufficiently ashamed that his cause of death was not discussed.

    At the grave I opened The Star. I said, “Well, Charlie, times have changed, thank God.

    Read more