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We are the New York area workplace advocate for people in the news business, and that includes some of the best journalists in the country.

The Newspaper Guild of New York represents more than 3,000 employees at New York area-based news organizations, as well as a few non-news organizations.

Since its launch in 1934 by crusading columnist Heywood Broun and others, the Guild has been the voice in the workplace for practitioners of big-city journalism and employees in advertising, circulation and other related areas. It started with newspapers, but today the Guild’s reach extends to workers in all media.

Guild members at Time Inc. were nearly unanimous on Oct. 10 in voting down a management contract offer that would have enabled to the company to outsource the jobs of more than half the journalists at its key magazines.
Time Inc. Guild members vote down management offer on Oct. 10.

Time Inc. Guild members vote down management offer on Oct. 10.

Guild members at Scholastic consider a new contract at a meeting on Sept. 19 before voting unanimously to ratify it.
Scholastic Guild members consider new contract at Sept. 19 meeting.

Scholastic Guild members consider new contract at Sept. 19 meeting.

Guild negotiators review Thomson Reuters opening proposal on Sept. 10.
Guild negotiators review Thomson Reuters opening proposal on Sept. 10.

Guild negotiators review Thomson Reuters opening proposal on Sept. 10.

Guild officers and members were among the thousands of union members who marched in the New York City Labor Day Parade on Sept. 6.
Guild contingent gets ready to join 2014 NYC Labor Day Parade on Sept. 6.

Guild contingent gets ready to join 2014 NYC Labor Day Parade on Sept. 6.

Secretary-Treasurer Peter Szekely briefs press about El Diario on Aug. 19.
Secretary-Treasurer Peter Szekely briefs press about El Diario on Aug. 19.

Secretary-Treasurer Peter Szekely briefs press about El Diario on Aug. 19.

    Local and Unit News

    RELEASE: Guild members nix Time Inc.'s 'final' contract offer

    October 10, 2014

    TIME INC. - After months of negotiations between the Newspaper Guild of New York and Time Inc. on a new contract for more than 200 newsroom employees, Guild members turned down the company’s so-called final contract offer in a nearly unanimous vote.

    Guild schedules member vote on Time Inc. contract offer

    October 3, 2014

    TIME INC. - The Guild will hold a meeting on Friday, Oct. 10 for members at Time Inc. to vote on a contract proposal that company managment representatives have described as their "last, best and final” offer. The package still would enable management to subcontract up to 60 of the slightly more than 200 Guild-represented, journalism-related jobs in the company, as well as another 100 temporary jobs.

    Hudson News adds lockers for Port Authority employees

    October 3, 2014

    HUDSON NEWS - After discussions with the Guild, Hudson News management has agreed to install 24 new lockers at Port Authority Bus Terminal, and to replace the worn out uniform shirts of employees who request it. Management also said that Port Authority-based employees must clock out and back in for their breaks, in addition to the starts and ends of their shifts.

    Times targets 100 in newsroom buyout; bonus for veterans

    September 30, 2014

    TIMES - Times management is offering all Guild-covered Newsroom and Editorial Department employees with at least five years of service a buyout that would be its richest package ever for veterans with at least 20 years under their belts. Management said the buyout offer, which followed discussions with the Guild, is aimed at cutting 100 Guild-covered and nonunion workers from the staff.

    Industry News

    Poynter to host African journalists turned away from USF St. Petersburg

    October 21, 2014

    The Poynter Institute will host a group of Edward R. Murrow journalists from African countries whose visit to the University of South Florida at St. Petersburg was canceled because of concerns about spread of the Ebola virus, Poynter president Tim Franklin announced today.

    In an impromptu meeting, Franklin told Poynter staff that the decision to host the journalists — who are not from Ebola-affected countries — is rooted in the best traditions of the institute.

    “Poynter has a long history and tradition of inclusion, it has a long history of training journalists, both here and abroad, and I think in that spirit, it’s something we can and should do at Poynter,” Franklin said.

    The journalists were scheduled to visit USF St. Petersburg for five days starting Oct. 31 as part of the Edward R. Murrow Program for Journalists, which brings 100 international journalists to the United States annually. University administrators canceled that visit, citing “concerns about transmission of Ebola virus

    RELATED: “Covering Ebola: A Poynter Conversation”

    The university’s decision to cancel the program Friday was motivated by worries from faculty, students and staff, said Jessica Blais, director of communications for the university and former director of marketing for the Poynter Institute.

    “One of the things we’ve emphasized to people over the last couple of days is that given concerns of faculty, students and staff, we really did not feel confident that we could present the program in the excellent form that we’ve provided in the past,” Blais said.

    On Monday, a few days after USF St. Petersburg finalized its decision not to host the event, World Partnerships Inc., a not-for-profit state department grantee that handles logistics and travel arrangements for the Murrow Program, reached out to Poynter and asked whether the institute would consider hosting the program. On Tuesday afternoon, the institute agreed to host the journalists for three days, starting Oct. 31 and continuing to Nov. 4.

    Although the not-for-profit got fairly short notice to find a host for the journalists, it’s used to adapting on the fly, said Gary Springer, president of World Partnerships Inc. The company often has to accommodate travel plans for many such international trips at once.

    “We run programs and groups through here almost every week,” Springer said.

    The list of journalists visiting St. Petersburg has been altered slightly since the university’s cancellation Friday. On Monday, the U.S. Department of State decided two journalists — from Liberia and Sierra Leone — would have their trip placed on hold because they come from areas affected by the outbreak, said Nathan Arnold, a spokesperson from the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs.

    When news of the university’s cancellation was made public Monday, several people from Poynter suggested that the institute host the Murrow group, said Kelly McBride, vice president of academic programs at the institute.

    “It seemed like the right thing to do, and I was really proud that people wanted to step up and do this,” McBride said.

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    Poynter’s News University to host a live conversation on covering Ebola

    October 21, 2014

    Nurse Barbara Smith practices proper hand hygiene while demonstrating the the use of personal protective equipment when dealing with Ebola during an education session in New York, Tuesday, Oct. 21, 2014. Thousands of participants, mostly health care workers, attended the session to review basic facts about Ebola and updated guidelines for protection against its spread. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

    Nurse Barbara Smith practices proper hand hygiene while demonstrating the the use of personal protective equipment when dealing with Ebola during an education session in New York, Tuesday, Oct. 21, 2014. Thousands of participants, mostly health care workers, attended the session to review basic facts about Ebola and updated guidelines for protection against its spread. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

    Poynter’s News University will host a live conversation at 10:30 a.m. Eastern on Thursday, October 23, on covering Ebola.

    The discussion, which is free, includes Poynter’s Kelly McBride and Tom Huang with The Dallas Morning News. I’ll be hosting the conversation.

    Questions we’ll take on include the following (from the conversation’s description):

    How to cover the topic with context and accuracy
    How to debunk myths about the Ebola virus
    How to find untold stories
    Ways you can localize the story for your community

    What do you want to know about covering Ebola? Email me or tweet questions and I’ll try and work them in. An archived replay will be available after the session. You can follow the conversation on Twitter with #CoveringEbola. For more, visit News University’s Covering Ebola page.

    And here’s a quick look at some of the ways we’ve covered Ebola so far at Poynter.

    The readers’ quick guide for understanding a medical crisis

    When writing about Ebola, what images should you use?

    Journalists struggle to balance reporting on Ebola with HIPAA

    From Dallas, 5 tips on covering Ebola

    How journalists covering the Ebola outbreak try to stay safe

    Follow @kristenhare
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    Times-Picayune will close New Orleans print facility, print in Alabama

    October 21, 2014

    The Times-Picayune

    The Times-Picayune will close its New Orleans print facility and print in Alabama, it announced Tuesday. About 100 production jobs will be lost, but none from the newsroom, the Advance-owned paper says.

    Ray Massett, the general manager of Advance Central Services Louisiana, says Advance Central Services Alabama will print the Picayune in Mobile, Alabama. The move “will reduce print-related costs, improve efficiencies and allow for greater use of color in the pages of The Times-Picayune,” the report says.

    ACS Alabama handles printing and packaging for The Times-Picayune’s sister paper, The Press-Register. Massett added that printing remotely is commonplace at many newspapers that formerly housed their presses near their newsrooms.

    Masset also said the building housing the current print facilities “may be donated to a nonprofit institution in the community.”

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    Tribune Publishing will reportedly buy Sun-Times’ suburban papers

    October 21, 2014

    Robert Feder

    Tribune Publishing will buy 38 suburban papers owned by Chicago Sun-Times parent Wrapports LLC, Robert Feder reports.

    “We do not comment on speculation,” Matthew Hutchison, a spokesperson for Tribune Publishing, told Poynter.

    Tribune Publishing CEO Jack Griffin said in July that purchasing “smaller newspapers in or near his existing markets” would be part of the recently spun-off company’s strategy. Since the year began, Tribune’s Baltimore Sun Media Group bought the Baltimore City Paper as well as two other Maryland papers, The Capital in Annapolis and the Carroll County Times.

    Last year Wrapports launched a hyperlocal service called Aggrego, which it said at the time could provide content that would back in to the Sun-Times Media Group’s papers. The Sun-Times has not replied for a request for comment about the sale report and what that might mean for Aggrego.

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